PDD
Pervasive Developmental Disorder Through the Years in the DSM
 
 

 
 

 

DSM Criteria through the years


DSM-I N/A (PDDs were not part of the DSM until 1980)

DSM-II N/A (PDDs were not part of the DSM until 1980)

DSM-III (1980)

Diagnostic Criteria for Childhood Onset Pervasive Developmental Disorder

A. Gross and sustained impairment in social relationships, e.g., lack of appropriate affective responsivity, Inappropriate clinging, asociality, lack of empathy.

B. At least three of the following:

1. sudden excessive anxiety manifested by such symptoms as free-floating anxiety, catastrophic reactions to everyday occurrences, inability to be consoled when upset, unexplained panic attacks,

2. constricted or inappropriate affect, including lack of appropriate fear reactions, unexplained rage reactions, end extreme mood lability,

3. resistance to change in the environment, e.g., upset if dinner time is changed, or insistence on doing things in the same manner every time, e.g., putting on clothes always in the same order,

4. oddities of motor movement, such as peculiar posturing, peculiar hand or finger movements, or walking on tiptoe,

5. abnormalities of speech, such as question-like melody, monotonous voice,

6. hyper or hypo-sensitivity to sensory stimuli. e.g., byperacusis,

7. self-mutilation, e.g., biting or hitting self, head banging.

C. Onset of the full syndrome after 30 months of age and before 12 years of age.

Absence of delusions, hallucinations, incoherence, or marked loosening of associations.

DSM-III-R (1987)

299.80

Pervasive Developmental Disorder Not Otherwise Specified

This category should be used when there is a qualitative impairment in the development of reciprocal social interaction and of verbal and nonverbal communication skills, but the criteria are not met for Autistic Disorder, Schizophrenia, or Schizotypal or Schizoid Personality Disorder. Some people with this diagnosis will exhibit a markedly restricted repertoire of activities and interests, but others will not.

DSM-IV (1994)

Pervasive Developmental Disorders

Pervasive Developmental Disorders are characterized by severe and pervasive impairment in several areas of development: reciprocal social interaction skills, communication skills, or the presence of stereotyped behavior, interests, and activities. The qualitative impairments that define these conditions are distinctly deviant relative to the individual's developmental level or mental age. This section contains Autistic Disorder, Rett's Disorder, Childhood Disintegrative Disorder, Asperger's Disorder, and Pervasive Developmental Disorder Not Otherwise Specified. These disorders are usually evident in the first years of life and are often associated with some degree of Mental Retardation, which, if present, should be coded on Axis II. The Pervasive Developmental Disorders are sometimes observed with a diverse group of other general medical conditions (e.g., chromosomal abnormalities, congenital infections, structural abnormalities of the central nervous system). If such conditions are present, they should be noted on Axis III. Although terms like "psychosis" and "childhood schizophrenia" were once used to refer to individuals with these conditions, there is considerable evidence to suggest that the Pervasive Developmental Disorders are distinct from Schizophrenia (however, an individual with Pervasive Developmental Disorder may occasionally later develop schizophrenia).

DSM-IV-R (2000)

Pervasive Developmental Disorders [also called Autism Spectrum Disorders] are characterized by severe and pervasive impairment in several areas of development: reciprocal social interaction skills, communication skills, or the presence of stereotyped behavior, interests, and activities.

Autistic Disorder

Rett's Disorder

Childhood Disintegrative Disorder

Asperger's Disorder

Pervasive Developmental Disorder Not Otherwise Specified.

These disorders are evident in the first years of life and are often associated with some degree of Mental Retardation, which, if present, should be coded on Axis II. The Pervasive Developmental Disorders are sometimes observed with a diverse group of other general medical conditions (e.g., chromosomal abnormalities, congenital infections, structural abnormalities of the central nervous system). If such conditions are present, they should be noted on Axis III. Although terms like "psychosis" and "childhood schizophrenia" were once used to refer to individuals with these conditions, there is considerable evidence to suggest that the Pervasive Developmental Disorders are distinct from Schizophrenia (however an individual with Pervasive Developmental Disorder may occasionally later develop Schizophrenia).

299.80 Pervasive Developmental Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (including Atypical Autism)

This category should be used when there is a severe and pervasive impairment in the development of reciprocal social interaction or verbal and nonverbal communication skills, or when stereotyped behavior, interests, and activities are present, but the criteria are not met for a specific Pervasive Developmental Disorder, Schizophrenia, Schizotypal Personality Disorder or Avoidant Personality Disorder. For example, this category includes "atypical autism"— presentations that do not meet the criteria for Autistic Disorder because of late age at onset, atypical symptomatology, or subthreshold symptomatology, or all of these.

 


©2007 Roy Richard Grinker